Data About Latinas Pay Gap

Posted on 05/18/2020.

María Jesús Alvarado Rivera was a journalist, teacher, and activist from Chincha, Peru. She is regarded as the “first modern champion of women’s rights in Peru” and spent her life committed to empowering women through establishing and expanding educational http://qazvin.biz/just-how-to-maintain-jamaican-women/ programs, access to work and political representation. Her essay “El Feminismo” was the first revolutionary essay of the twentieth century in Peru, and her lectures are regarded as one of the first examples of public feminist discourse in Peru.

Historically, job losses in recessions, including the Great Recession, have centered around goods-producing sectors, such as manufacturing and construction, in which men have a greater presence. Just 68 Latina women are promoted into a management role for every 100 men promoted overall, according to the 2019 Women in the Workplace study conducted by McKinsey & Co. and Lean In.

The Wage Gap For Latina Workers Is Still 54 Cents That’S Troubling.

The level of educational attainment for Latinas has risen in the past few years, yet it still sits at a level significantly lower than that of white women. Latina women experienced higher rates of human papillomavirus, or HPV, than white women as of 2010 and twice the death rate from cervical cancer. Seventeen percent of Latina women receive Medicaid, compared to 9 percent for white women. Hypertension is slightly less prevalent among Latina women, at 29 percent, than among white women, at 31 percent.

Screening mammograms are the leading method of identifying early breast cancer. According to a National Cancer Society Survey, only 61 percent of Hispanic/Latina women over age 40 reported having a screening mammogram in the two years prior to the survey, compared to 65 percent of white women. In the United States, the rate of breast cancer in Hispanic/Latina women is lower than in non-Hispanic white women. (The incidence is even less in Hispanic/Latina women who were not born in the country.) But those statistics can be deceiving.

Although feminists regularly cite the gender wage gap as a scourge holding back women in the workplace, in fact for Latinas, the gap is much worse. According to some estimates, Latinas earnjust 55 centsfor every dollar earned by non-Hispanic white men.

“Women might be making something at home but they aren’t thinking about a small business, so we provide resources. One of this year’s sponsors is the Latino Economic Development Center, so these women can have a chance to figure out if this is something they can grow,” she said.

  • We then field-tested the adapted curriculum, and Latina community representatives reviewed it before implementation.
  • Lessons learned through the cultural adaptation process by community agencies included the challenge—yet importance—of addressing the diverse languages, gender roles, and social norms prevalent among Latina women.
  • We collected ethnographic data on their beliefs related to gender and social norms and sexual communication, as well as their knowledge and misconceptions concerning HIV.
  • Information obtained from the focus groups, Latina HIV prevention workers, community representatives, and a review of the literature highlighted the importance of making the intervention culturally congruent.
  • We used a published adaptation framework (ADAPT-ITT)20 to guide a systematic process of selecting and then adapting SiSTA, an HIV risk reduction intervention for young African American women that is widely disseminated with CDC support,21 for use with Latina women.
  • Before developing the AMIGAS adaptation, we conducted 3 focus groups with ethnically and culturally diverse Latina women to explore the factors that increased their HIV risks.

We collected data with the audio computer-assisted self-interviewing method, chosen to enhance confidentiality and participants’ comfort levels and to increase comprehension among women with low literacy. Participants completed the baseline surveys immediately before random assignment to the study conditions.

Spalluto hopes to conduct future studies that dive deeper into the relationship between a community health worker and a patient to determine factors that make the approach successful. Insight into these relationships could allow the model to be translated to other cultures. “This study would not have been possible without the commitment of our community partners and the dedication of Angelica Deaton, our promotora,” said Spalluto.

Women workers are only 7.3 percent of those in registered apprenticeships.33 Of women who are in apprenticeship programs, less than 10 percent are Hispanic, compared to men in apprenticeships, almost 16 percent of whom identified as Hispanic. Furthermore, women earn less in their apprenticeship programs than men do. Hispanic women earn the least in apprenticeship programs compared to all other groups by racial, ethnic, and gender breakdown.

Few studies to date, however, have evaluated the population health implications of the election for Latina mothers and their children. The 2016 presidential election may have been associated with adverse health outcomes of Latina women and their newborns. My wife sometimes listens to Spanish language news where she tells me the negative news dominates even more than on English language news broadcasts.

NWLC reports that Latinas who work full-time, year-round jobs and also have a bachelor’s degree generally only earn about $52,037 per year. A White, non-Hispanic man with only an associate’s degree, on the other hand, generally makes $54,620. This comparison offers a bleak perspective of the position that Latina women are in – that despite having more education, some Latina women still earn lower wages and must work longer to make the same amount of money. Black and Latina women who continue to work often have jobs that put them at high risk of contracting COVID-19, such as nursing assistants, home health aides, grocery store clerks, and child care providers for essential workers. For example, nearly one-third of nursing assistants and home health aides are Black women, according to an analysis by the Center for American Progress.

Latina Workers Have To Work Nearly 11 Months Into 2019 To Be Paid The Same As White Non

Bureau of Labor Statistics, 32.2 percent of Latina women work in the service sector, compared with only 20 percent of white women, and service workers are almost 20 percent less likely to have either paid sick leave or retirement benefits. Latina-owned businesses are concentrated in the industries of health care at 20 percent, administrative services at 18 percent, retail at 10 percent, professional at 9 percent, and real estate at 6 percent. Much of these differences are grounded in the presence of occupational segregation.